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Nov 26, 2008
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Exclusive Extract From George W Bush's First Book - "This Is What I Meant To Say"

Presidential Gift Season Sensation

George W Bush is to explain what he was trying to say by recounting all the famous Bushisms that have become synonymous with his presidency in a book to be published in time for the upcoming gift giving season.

What follows is a short excerpt from the book "This Is What I Meant To Say":

What I said: "Tribal sovereignty means that; it's sovereign. I mean, you're a — you've been given sovereignty, and you're viewed as a sovereign entity. And therefore the relationship between the federal government and tribes is one between sovereign entities." —Washington, D.C., Aug. 6, 2004

What I meant to say: Well, tribal sovereignty is sovereign, does anybody disagree with that? No, I thought not.

So, if you've been given sovereignty, and that includes other people viewing you as sovereign, then you are sovereign - the federal government knows what is sovereign. Am I talking to myself here? Hello?

What I said: "Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we. They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we." —Washington, D.C., Aug. 5, 2004
What I meant to say: When you write this down and read it back it makes perfect sense to me. It's just when you read it out it sounds kinda funny. I just hope that the history of my presidency is measured by the readers and not the listeners.
What I said: "I know what I believe. I will continue to articulate what I believe and what I believe — I believe what I believe is right." —Rome, Italy, July 22, 2001
What I meant to say: You've got to have a dream before your dream can come true.
What I said: "I am here to make an announcement that this Thursday, ticket counters and airplanes will fly out of Ronald Reagan Airport." —Washington, D.C., Oct. 3, 2001

What I meant to say: Ticket counters are the guys who count the tickets of the people who get on the plane, right?

The guys who take your tickets when you get on the plane then join the in-flight stewards on the plane so you would expect them to fly out of the airport on the planes.

I mean double duh here?

What I said: "It is white." —after being asked by a child in Britain what the White House was like, July 19, 2001
What I meant to say: The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. Located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C., it was built between 1792 and 1800 of white-painted Aquia sandstone in the late Georgian style and has been the executive residence of every U.S. President since John Adams. When Thomas Jefferson moved into the home in 1801, he (with architect Benjamin Henry Latrobe) expanded the building outward, creating two colonnades which were meant to conceal stables and storage.

In 1814, during the War of 1812, the mansion was set ablaze by the British Army in the Burning of Washington, destroying the interior and charring much of the exterior walls. Reconstruction began almost immediately, and President James Monroe moved into the partially reconstructed house in October 1817. Construction continued with the addition of the South Portico in 1824 and the North in 1829. Due to crowding within the executive mansion itself, President Theodore Roosevelt had nearly all work offices relocated to the newly-constructed West Wing in 1901. Eight years later, President William Howard Taft expanded the West Wing and created the first Oval Office which was eventually moved as the section was expanded. The third-floor attic was converted to living quarters in 1927 by augmenting the existing hip roof with long shed dormers. A newly constructed East Wing was used as a reception area for social events; both new wings were connected by Jefferson's colonnades. East Wing alterations were completed in 1946 creating additional office space. By 1948, the house's load-bearing exterior walls and internal wood beams were found to be close to failure. Under Harry S. Truman, the interior rooms were completely dismantled, resulting in the construction of a new internal load-bearing steel framework and the reassembly of the interior rooms.

Today, the White House Complex includes the Executive Residence (in which the First Family resides), the West Wing (the location of the Oval Office, Cabinet Room, and Roosevelt Room), and the East Wing (the location of the office of the First Lady and White House Social Secretary), as well as the Old Executive Office Building, which houses the executive offices of the President and Vice President.

The White House is made up of six stories—the Ground Floor, State Floor, Second Floor, and Third Floor, as well as a two-story basement. The term White House is regularly used as a metonym for the Executive Office of the President of the United States and for the president's administration and advisors in general. The property is owned by the National Park Service and is part of the President's Park. In 2007, it was ranked second on the American Institute of Architects's List of America's Favorite Architecture. (Wikipedia)

 

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